About the 2005 Reads

To Center on the Cultural Treasures of the Middle East

Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti Reads is a community initiative to promote reading and civic dialogue through the shared experience of reading and discussing a common book.

Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti Reads is a community initiative to promote reading and civic dialogue through the shared experience of reading and discussing a common book.

A selection committee of community leaders, students and educators in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area chose Amin Maalouf's Leo Africanus. For more information about this year's selection, click on the title below. (For the other two books under consideration, please visit our Resources page.)

Leo Africanus

   

Amin Maalouf; translated by Peter Slugett. Leo Africanus.
Chicago: New Amsterdam Books, 1992, c1988.


Check for copies at the Ann Arbor District Library...

Past Reads

Check out our online collection of videos of programs from past Reads.

Washtenaw Reads 2017: A Very Good Read

About the Reads: 2017
Suggest a Title: 2017
Book Discussions: 2017
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2017
How to Participate: 2017
AAReads Sponsors: 2017
AAReads Resources: 2017

2016: A Very Good Read

About the Reads: 2016
Suggest a Title: 2016
Book Discussions: 2016
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2016
How to Participate: 2016
AAReads Sponsors: 2016
AAReads Resources: 2016

2015: A Very Good Read

About the Reads: 2015
Suggest a Title: 2015
Book Discussions: 2015
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2015
How to Participate: 2015
AAReads Sponsors: 2015
AAReads Resources: 2015

2014: A Very Good Read

About the Reads: 2014
Suggest a Title: 2014
Book Discussions: 2014
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2014
How to Participate: 2014
AAReads Sponsors: 2014
AAReads Resources: 2014

2013: Understanding Race

About the Reads: 2013
Book Discussions: 2013
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2013
How to Participate: 2013
AAReads Sponsors: 2013
AAReads Resources: 2013

2012: Language: How We Communicate

About the Reads: 2012
Book Discussions: 2012
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2012
How to Participate: 2012
AAReads Sponsors: 2012
AAReads Resources: 2012

2011: What Makes Life Worth Living?

About the Reads: 2011
Book Discussions: 2011
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2011
How to Participate: 2011
AAReads Sponsors: 2011
AAReads Resources: 2011

2010: Michigan

About the Reads: 2010
Book Discussions: 2010
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2010
How to Participate: 2010
AAReads Sponsors: 2010
AAReads Resources: 2010

2009: The Universe: Yours to Discover

About the Reads: 2009
Book Discussions: 2009
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2009
How to Participate: 2009
AAReads Sponsors: 2009
AAReads Resources: 2009

2008: China and America: Bridging Two Worlds

About the Reads: 2008
Book Discussions: 2008
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2008
How to Participate: 2008
AAReads Sponsors: 2008
AAReads Resources: 2008

2007: "We the People..."

About the Reads: 2007
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2007
How to Participate: 2007
AAReads Sponsors: 2007
Community Partners: 2007
AAReads Resources: 2007

2006: Revolutions in Science

About the Reads: 2006
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2006
How to Participate: 2006
AAReads Sponsors: 2006
Community Partners: 2006
AAReads Resources: 2006

2005: Cultural Treasures of the Middle East

About the Reads: 2005
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2005
How to Participate: 2005
AAReads Sponsors: 2005
Community Partners: 2005
AAReads Resources: 2005

2004: Brown v. The Board Of Education

About the Reads: 2004
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2004
How to Participate: 2004
AAReads Sponsors: 2004
Community Partners: 2004
AAReads Resources: 2004

2003: Abraham Lincoln's DNA

About Ann Arbor Reads: 2003
Ann Arbor Reads Events: 2003
How To Participate: 2003
AAReads Sponsors: 2003
Community Partners: 2003
Click here for a printable Resource Guide for 2003's Ann Arbor Reads: Abraham Lincoln's DNA

How To Participate: 2006

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2006 is a community-wide event! How may you participate?

Hold A Discussion Group In Your Community

Organize an event or discussion related to the read. Events may be open to the public or restricted. Examples include:

  • Book clubs wishing to use the book at a private meeting or discussion
  • College or high school instructors assigning the book to their class
  • Local workplaces hosting discussion groups for their employees
  • Coffee shops inviting customers to connect over coffee on a particular night
  • Film societies presenting a film related to the topic

Learn How To Moderate a Discussion Group

Training will be provided, at several conveniently located sites in January, for individuals who would like to learn how to moderate a discussion about the book for their organization or reading group.

These sessions will be interactive classes, conducted by Library staff and University staff. Model practices and advice on holding successful group discussions will be central features of the training. Registration is required and space is limited.

Sessions will be offered on the following dates at these locations:

Tuesday, January 10, 7:00 – 8:30 pm
Ann Arbor District Library
Third Floor Meeting Space
343 South Fifth Avenue

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads: Galileo's Daughter

This is one of three titles under consideration for this year's Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads, which will focus on Revolutions In Science: the people, theories, explanations and discoveries that challenged our thinking and changed the world.

The son of a musician, Galileo never left Italy, though his inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. Most sensationally, his telescopes allowed him to revel a new reality in the heavens and reinforce the astounding argument that the earth moves around the sun. For this belief, he was brought before the Holy Office of the Inquisition, accused of heresy and forced to spend his last years under house arrest.

Inspired by a long fascination with Galileo, and by the remarkable surviving letters of Galileo's daughter, a cloistered nun, Sobel wrote this biography. Moving between Galileo's public life and his daughter's sequestered world, he illuminates the era when humanity's perception of its place in the cosmos was being overturned and when one man sought to reconsile the Heaven he revered as a good Catholic with the heavens he revealed through his telescope.

What did you think of this book? Tell us!

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads: Beak of the Finch

This is one of three titles under consideration for this year's Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads, which will focus on Revolutions In Science: the people, theories, explanations and discoveries that challenged our thinking and changed the world.

On a desert island in the heart of the Galapagos archipeglago, where Darwin received his first inklings of the theory of evolution, two scientists, Peter and Rosemary Grant, have spent twenty years proving that Darwin did not know the strength of his own theory. For among the finches of Daphne Major, natural selection is neither rare nor slow: it is taking place by the hour and we can watch.

In this dramatic story of groundbreaking scientific research, Jonathan Weiner follows these scientists as they watch Darwin's finches and come up with a new understanding of lif itself.

Tell us what you think of this book!

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads: A Fish Caught in Time

This is one of three titles under consideration for this year's Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads, which will focus on Revolutions In Science: the people, theories, explanations and discoveries that challenged our thinking and changed the world.

The coelacanth (see-lo-canth) is no ordinary fish. Five feet long, with luminescent eyes and limb like fins, this bizarre creature, presumed to be extinct, was discovered in 1938 by an amateur icthyologist who recognized it from fossils dating back 400 million years. The discovery was immediately dubbed the "greatest scientific find of the century," but the excitement that ensued was even more incredible. This is the entrancing story of that most rare and precious fish — our own great-uncle forty million times removed.

Let us know what you think of this book!

Syndicate content